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Character Analysis

Page history last edited by Jayson Yeagley 10 years, 5 months ago

 

 Character Analysis Outline

I. Introduction

a. Hook your reader into your paper. Choose an introductory technique. See Pre-AP Handbook.

 

 

b. Introduce the book and author

 

 

c. Introduce the character

 

 

d. Thesis: one sentence opinion statement that your ENTIRE paper will examine.

 

 

II. Body Paragraph #1 topic__________________________________

a. CLAIM/Topic Sentence (circle topic, underline opinion word) It must be directly related to the THESIS

 

 

 

b. Evidence -  Direct or Indirect Quote with page number and/or description from the text (use at least two specific references to the text in each body paragraph)

 

1.

 

2.

c. Explanation – How does your evidence/quote clearly relates to your topic and proves your claim? For instance, how does this example from the text show character change?

 

 

 

II. Body Paragraph #2 topic__________________________________

a. CLAIM/Topic Sentence (circle topic, underline opinion word) It must be directly related to the THESIS

 

 

 

b. Evidence -  Direct or Indirect Quote with page number and/or description from the text (use at least two specific references to the text in each body paragraph)

 

1.

 

2.

c. Explanation – How does your evidence/quote clearly relates to your topic and proves your claim? For instance, how does this example from the text show character change?

 

II. Body Paragraph #1 topic__________________________________

a. CLAIM/Topic Sentence (circle topic, underline opinion word) It must be directly related to the THESIS

 

 

 

b. Evidence -  Direct or Indirect Quote with page number and/or description from the text (use at least two specific references to the text in each body paragraph)

 

1.

 

2.

c. Explanation – How does your evidence/quote clearly relates to your topic and proves your claim? For instance, how does this example from the text show character change?

 

 

 

V. Conclusion (choose at least one of these)

What your conclusion should do:

a.     Answer the question "So What?" Show your readers why this paper was important. Show them that your paper was meaningful and useful.

b.     Synthesize, don't summarize Don't simply repeat things that were in your paper. They have read it. Show them how the points you made and the support and examples you used were not random, but fit together.

c.     Redirect your readers Give your reader something to think about, perhaps a way to use your paper in the "real" world. If your introduction went from general to specific, make your conclusion go from specific to general. Think globally.

d.     Create a new meaning You don't have to give new information to create a new meaning. By demonstrating how your ideas work together, you can create a new picture. Often the sum of the paper is worth more than its parts.

 

Strategies for conclusions:

e.     Echoing the introduction: Echoing your introduction can be a good strategy if it is meant to bring the reader full-circle. If you begin by describing a scenario, you can end with the same scenario as proof that your essay was helpful in creating a new understanding.

f.      Challenging the reader: By issuing a challenge to your readers, you are helping them to redirect the information in the paper, and they may apply it to their own lives.

g.     Looking to the future: Looking to the future can emphasize the importance of your paper or redirect the readers' thought process. It may help them apply the new information to their lives or see things more globally.

h.     Posing questions: Posing questions, either to your readers or in general, may help your readers gain a new perspective on the topic, which they may not have held before reading your conclusion. It may also bring your main ideas together to create a new meaning.

 

 

 

REMEMBER: No first person. Show, don’t tell. Do not do a plot summary, besides first paragraph and then only what is necessary to understand your analysis. If you avoid chronological evidence (following the order of the book), you will avoid a “book report.

 

 

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